Non Medical Home Care versus Medical Home Care


Because FirstLight Home Care provides non-medical home care, we are often asked about the difference between medical and non-medical care.

What Is Non Medical Care?
Non medical care is often referred to as “assisted living”, “transitional care”, or “private
duty” care. Non-Medical home care is usually provided by caregivers, certified nursing aides (CNAs), and home health aides (HHAs).

With non-medical in-home care, our caregivers provide personal and companion
care in the comfort of our client’s homes, wherever home may be – a residence,
assisted living facility, retirement community, etc. Too often seniors are lonely and need someone to talk to, someone who can help prepare meals, do their laundry, perform light housekeeping duties, take them to bingo, and help with the shopping and errands. Or maybe they need assistance with personal home care services or what is known as ADL or activities of daily living — such as getting dressed, showering, transferring from bed to chair, and more. Our caregivers do not administer medications, but they remind seniors and the elderly to take their medication on-time.

Non medical home care is not just for seniors – at FirstLight Home Care, many of our younger clients are recovering from plastic surgery, an orthopedic procedure, or are
new moms who just need a little help around the house for a short time. Our home companions also provide much needed peace of mind for young adults suffering from multiple sclerosis, cancer, diabetes and other chronic illnesses.

Did you know you can hamper your recovery if you try and do too much too soon? Our caregivers make sure you get the rest you need, enabling you to recover at home faster.
Plus, who doesn’t want to be in their own bed among familiar surroundings that are comfortable?

What Is Medical or Skilled Care?
Medical home care or “skilled care” is usually prescribed by a doctor after an injury or hospital stay. Home healthcare is provided by licensed registered nurses RNs, licensed practical nurses (LPNs), Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs), physical therapists, occupational therapists or physician assistants.  These professionals can administer medications, insert catheters, and provide wound care.

Both medical and non-medical providers are either licensed or certified and both
focus on one thing: helping clients get stronger, safely.

Who Pays For Medical Versus Non Medical Care?
Medicare, Medigap, Managed Care Medicaid, and private pay absorb the costs of skilled
care. Non medical care is usually paid for privately or is covered by a portion of Veteran’s benefits or some medical and long term care insurance. On occasion, some healthcare insurance plans offer limited respite care, which is care while the family is away and usually consists of 80- hours/year. Skilled care is usually temporary, whereas home care can go on indefinitely on a short or long term basis.

Here’s a chart which better explains the differences:

Medical
Care
Non-Medical
Care
Duration Usually temporary Can be short or long term
Staff LPNs, LVNs, RNs, physical therapists, occupational
therapists.
Caregivers, certified nursing aides
and home health aides.
Care Medical procedures such as wound care,
medication changes, ostomy, injections, tracheotomy
care and ventilator support.
Personal and companion care, bathing,  transportation, running errands, mobility, conversation, grocery shopping and
meal preparation.
Who Pays Medicare, Medicaid, Medigap, Veteran’s
benefits and private pay.
Some medical and long term care insurance, private pay, and Veteran’s benefits.

 

If you or a loved one needs non medical home care, the caregivers at FirstLight Home Care are dedicated to keeping you in your home and independent.

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